Old Salt Union

With Fate McAfee & Dylan LeBlanc

A great band is more than the proverbial sum of its parts, and in the pursuit of becoming something that can cut through the clutter of YouTube stars and contest show runner-ups, a great roots music band must become a way of life. Less likely to rely on production or image, they’ve got to connect with their audience only through the craftsmanship of their songs, the energy they channel on the stage and the story that brings them together.

Old Salt Union is a string band founded by a horticulturist, cultivated by classically trained musicians, and fueled by a vocalist/bass player who is also a hip-hop producer with a fondness for the Four Freshmen. It is this collision of styles and musical vocabularies that informs their fresh approach to bluegrass and gives them an electric live performance vibe that seems to pull more from Vaudeville than the front porch.



Fate McAfee began writing original music at the age of 20, recorded his first full length studio album at 22, and has played small festivals and coffee shops and dive bars everywhere from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River, from the streets of New Orleans to theaters in Kentucky. He is from West Tennessee originally and typically plays solo, but collaborated with several talented musicians for his debut album "Little Bill & the Late Fees", recorded in Paducah, Kentucky, where he currently resides.
 


DYLAN LEBLANC KNOWS SECOND CHANCES DON’T COME AROUND OFTEN.
BUT, NEITHER DO VOICES LIKE HIS.

Overwhelmed by the speed at which his gift took him from Applebee’s server to “the new Neil Young” in a matter of months, he walked away from an unlikely major label deal after releasing two critically acclaimed albums. He slipped into a blur of booze and self-doubt. Exhausted and damaged at just 23-years-old, Dylan came home to Muscle Shoals, Alabama to write a new life for himself.

In between the moments of clarity and a few familiar falls, he also wrote a new album, Cautionary Tale: a collection of shimmering, arresting songs with the same haunting vocals that caught the attention of Lucinda Williams and Bruce Springsteen, now with a sharpened edge honed by hastened maturity.

Showtime